Author: Erin Granados

First Friday, October 2021

Each first Friday of the month, Downtown Brunswick closes off Newcastle Street for you to enjoy art, music, food and entertainment, with activities that are fun for the entire family.

Visit Brunswick DDA’s event page for more details.

The Dark Masquerade Ball

A Masquerade Ball organized by Peacock Productions benefiting Keep Golden Isles Beautiful. See the Facebook event page for details.

Formal Attire is required and masks are encouraged. There will be a cash bar and raffle. Entertainment will be provided. Tickets are required.

First Friday, September 2021

Each first Friday of the month, Downtown Brunswick closes off Newcastle Street for you to enjoy art, music, food and entertainment, with activities that are fun for the entire family.

Visit Brunswick DDA’s event page for more details.

Peaches to Beaches

Peaches to the Beaches is a community wide yard sale extending along 341. However, this event is more than just a yard sale. Downtown Brunswick’s Peaches to Beaches has a wide variety of vendors including locally made goods, food, and more! Visit Brunswick DDA’s event page for more information.

Peaches to Beaches

Peaches to the Beaches is a community wide yard sale extending along 341. However, this event is more than just a yard sale. Downtown Brunswick’s Peaches to Beaches has a wide variety of vendors including locally made goods, food, and more! Visit Brunswick DDA’s event page for more information.

July 2021

The time has come to bring everyone who supports Forward Brunswick up to date on the latest developments. The enthusiasm for Forward Brunswick as a result of important meetings at College of Coastal Georgia and the Brunswick-Glynn County Library has continued in spite of the constraints of COVID-19 protocols.

In January 2021, the boards of New City Brunswick and Forward Brunswick made the decision to combine their missions under the title, Forward Brunswick. The corporate charter and 501(c)(3) status of New City Brunswick will continue under the new name of Forward Brunswick.  A new Chair of the Board of Directors was elected; we congratulate and welcome Ben Slade to the position.  Additionally, Erin Granados has been named Executive Director.  

Now is a good time to revisit the mission and vision for Forward Brunswick:

Our mission is to advocate people-centric initiatives to foster economic vitality.  
We focus on the quality-of-life areas of diverse housing types, attractive surroundings, and available community amenities.
We network and partner with local resources to seek and assist with solutions for community requests and the longevity of neighborhood gratification.

To properly pave our path to growth and success, Jenn McEwen of McEwen Solutions will be leading our strategic planning process.  Jenn is an experienced nonprofit professional and consultant with more than a decade of nonprofit experience, education, and expertise. The strategic planning process begins in July and will be completed within 90 days.  A formal report will be shared when complete.  

During strategic planning, various stakeholders will be engaged and community data will be analyzed.  Additionally, the results of a recent synthesis exercise by GA Conservancy will be leveraged.  13 community studies such as Blueprint Brunswick, Envision Glynn, Revitalizing Norwich Corridor, and Brunswick RSVP were reviewed for common themes, projects, and policies as well as gaps and opportunities.  

A new website and social media channels are under construction and will be introduced with appropriate publicity.  We look forward to sharing these platforms and additional updates with you soon.

Thank you for your continued support and enthusiasm of our mission to advocate people-centric initiatives to foster economic vitality.  As we know from countless other cities, quality-of-life attracts people and people create economic vitality.  We are excited to roll out re-energized Forward Brunswick!  

Sincerely,

Bert Roughton
Former Forward Brunswick Leader

Ben Slade
Chair of the Board of Directors

Erin Granados
Executive Director

Horseshoe Crabs

You see them washed up on a Glynn County island beach, and they’re not exactly pretty. 

Horseshoe crabs look like weirdly configured helmets. They range in color from brown or brown-green to reddish, with spikes on their tail section. And unless you’re a bird or a fish, they’re nothing you would regard as good food.

But, ah. Horseshoe crabs are so important.

These animals are 450 million years old. They have survived four global extinctions. They are, truth be told, not crustaceans as are most crabs, but rather, arthropods, which means they’re more closely related to spiders. 

What makes them vital – for humans – is their milky-blue blood. It contains a substance known as limulus amebocyte lysate, which detects a type of harmful bacteria known as an endotoxin.

If an endotoxin creeps into vaccines, other drugs, or even into artificial hips and knees that are used as replacements, lives can be lost.

Horseshoe-crabs blood is the only known natural source for that pharmaceutical endotoxin, which costs $60,000 per gallon. That blood has saved countless lives since it was discovered in 1956 to be an infection remedy.

It is why, each spring, under a full moon, as the crabs crawl across Atlantic Coast beaches to lay their eggs, pharmaceutical companies collect a half-million horseshoe crabs. Blood is drawn, and the animals are returned to the sea. 

It seems like a win-win for everyone. But, sadly, it is not. Not for the horseshoe crab. Nor for migratory birds and fish that depend on the crab’s protein-rich eggs for survival.

Horseshoe crab populations have fallen sharply in some locations. It has not helped that horseshoe crabs are popular in some places as fish bait. And, so, the species has come under protection as scientists continue to work, with promise, on a manufactured option for horseshoe-crab blood.

A wondrous animal that has survived 450 million years and four global extinctions is battling again to stay alive. If its usual good fortunes prevail, horseshoe crabs will remain with us for a few more millennia, at least.

-Lynn Henning, author and journalist

**Picture by PBS**

Liberty Ships Trail

Brunswick’s Liberty Ships Trail is a segment of the East Coast Greenway.  The East Coast Greenway vision is a 3,000 mile route from Maine to Florida.  Georgia will have 144 total miles but is only 13% complete.

How Pine Trees Rescued Brunswick

On January 5, 1938, Mayor Hunter Hopkins started the year’s first City of Brunswick General Commission meetings with a grim account of the city’s financial standing. Municipal employees were still struggling along with wages that had been cut as much as 50% since 1933. There had been no systematic collection of personal property taxes in years, and Brunswick’s cash position was “very embarrassing.”

Commissioners wrestled with decisions on taxes and fees to refill the city’s coffers. Anyone who rode a bicycle on Brunswick’s streets was required to buy a license for a quarter. Business licenses for fortune-tellers and clairvoyants, intended to discourage that particular enterprise, cost a whopping $100. Other employment, however, was on the rise when hope emerged in the form of the ever-present Georgia pine. 

In the late 1800s, the idea of making paper from trees instead of using cotton rags was introduced. The nation’s need for paper grew in the 20th century with the demand for schoolbooks, novels, and, most of all, newspapers. A vigorous market is the mother of invention, and soon the use of wood fiber in paper mills grew into a major industry in upstate New York and Wisconsin. Although this in itself was not great news for Brunswick, the next innovation was. 

Further research into the complex pulping process required to make paper revealed the soft woods of South Georgia’s pine trees yielded a longer, broader fiber than the hardwoods of the northeast. However, the export of forest products from the Port of Brunswick, once a proud leader in the export of railroad ties, turpentine and lumber, declined sharply after a national financial crisis in 1893. So, decades later, the realization that pine trees were once again a cash crop was welcome news. The paper industry came to town in the form of Brunswick Pulp and Paper Company, and the city could not have been happier. 

In October 1937, the city gladly paved roads to the new plant in preparation for its opening in 1938. Over the next eight decades, thousands of Brunswick’s citizens, as well as workers from nearby towns and counties, prospered from employment, educational opportunities, and other benefits.  The community has enjoyed the generosity of the mill’s various owners over the years. Today, operating as Brunswick Cellulose, Inc., the mill continues to give back to the community that once struggled to collect its 25-cent bicycle tax from hard-pressed citizens. So if you have ever been tempted to hug a tree, start with a Georgia pine. 

-Leslie Faulkenberry, author and local historian

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